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Fishman AFX Acoustic Effect Pedals Review

July 11, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 



Fishman AFX Acoustic Guitar StompboxFor years, ACOUSTIC-ELECTRIC players that wanted to process their instruments with effects have faced a dilemma. Because acoustic instruments have a refined, subtle sound, only studio-quality effects will do when you want to process acoustic tones. Read more

Line 6 POD HD300 Review

May 24, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Line 6 HD300 POD Late last year, Line 6 ramped up their strategy to claim a larger stake in the Multi-Effects arena. The flagship series they constructed to spearhead the entry, was the POD HD series. Before this series, the market was largely dominated by a handful of large companies, namely Digitech, Boss, and a few others. To this day, these large companies still hold the large share, but that all may change in the future. Read more

EHX Micro POG Guitar Octave Pedal Review

May 10, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

ElectroHarmonix POG Guitar Octave Pedal Bored with the guitar’s four-octave range (and that’s only if you have a 24-fret guitar)? You could succumb to the seven-string itch, but that will only increase your range by a perfect fourth (or five half steps). No wonder many guitarists lust for other instruments like the bass, six-string bass, 12-string guitar or—the horror—ukulele or mandolin. Thanks to the ElectroHarmonix Micro POG, you can expand the range of your guitar by two octaves without cheating on your faithful ax. Read more

Maxon Reissue Series Effects Pedals

February 28, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Maxon Analog Delay Effects Pedal ReissueThe Maxon’s converted product line from the Seventies is being reissued, beginning with four models. Originally released in 1979, the Maxon OD808 Overdrive employs the IC chip of the original unit to create a vacuum tube-style overdrive, its smooth, creamy crunch tone caught on quickly, and helped to launch a long line of predecessors as well as imitators. While the D&S Distortion and Sustainer produces transistor distortion with tones that range from subtle overdrive to extreme fuzz. The AD80 Analog Delay creates 10-300ms of warm analog delay time, and the PT999 Phase Tone produces intense phasing with low-noise design and a wide dynamic range. List prices are as follows: OD808, $185.00; D&S Distortion and Sustainer, $180.00; AD80, $335.00; PT999, 190.00.

Seymour Duncan Twin Tube Mayhem Guitar Pedal Review

February 12, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Seymour Duncan SFX-04 Twin Tube Mayhem Distortion Guitar Effects PedalWHO COULD HAVE imagined that a decades-old company solely devoted to pickup winding would suddenly set the guitar industry on tilt with masterfully crafted pedals like the Twin Tube Classic, Lava box, Power Grid, Shape Shifter and Tweak Fuzz. Never before has a specialized company like Seymour Duncan so successfully diversified its product line and received such high marks for its freshman effort.

Another great addition to the company’s stomp box line is the anxiously awaited Twin Tube Mayhem pedal. This is the Twin Tube Classic’s criminally insane brother, born of Duncan’s malicious intent and capable of terrifying acts of sonic aggression. Like the Classic, the Mayhem is more of a footswitchable tube preamp than a mere stomp box by virtue of its standalone ability to generate tube- derived gain and control a full-waveform signal, as opposed to only shaping or boosting portions of the sound to create a desired effect. Simply put, Duncan’s Mayhem conjures diabolic high gain like you’ve never heard from a pedal. Read more

NAMM 2011: Tech 21 unveils three new guitar pedals

January 17, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

NAMM 2011 — The evolution of the chorus effect seems to have gotten stuck in ’80s pop, along with over-processed guitars, cheesy synths and popped collars. This ain’t that kind of chorus.

When we designed the Boost Chorus pedals we went back to the ’70s, when choruses were rich, smooth and manly. We figured out what made these vintage stompboxes sound so good and poured that knowledge into a new kind of chorus pedal with greatly improved performance and a whole slew of never-before-heard sounds. Slapback, echo, flanging and doubling effects are all possible from the modestly named Boost Chorus pedals.

Tech 21 Boost Chorus

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Designed primarily for guitar (but sounds great on everything else) the Boost Chorus features unprecedented tweakability for this type of pedal. No fewer than six controls allow players to easily dial-in the right tone, speed and depth of the effect.

The Mix control allows a 0-100% wet blend of the effect, while the Level control offers increasing amounts of boost to compensate for the volume loss perceived with chorus. The final control is the Pre-Delay, which alters the chorus’ range to produce effects from flange/chorus, to regular chorus, to chorus/doubler.

The secret weapon is the Multi Voice switch. Engage this to bask in the multiple chorus voices of an Ensemble-style effect

Tech 21 Boost Chorus Bass

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Because of the way traditional chorus pedals typically interact with their amps, most bass players would rather put an angry badger on their pedalboard. The Boost Chorus Bass avoids seasick tones, and badgers, through a specially-tailored design.

It features the same control set as the standard Boost Chorus, including the Multi Voice switch, but differs in having a Detune control in place of the Pre-Delay. The Detune control adjusts the pitch of the choral voices, adding sonic girth to create thick, lush, bass-perfect chorus.

Speed and Depth controls add modulation, so at minimum your fundamental notes are preserved. Finally, a chorus that works in harmony with your bass.

Roto Choir

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No musician can deny the deep, swirling glory of a vintage rotating speaker cabinet, that uniquely lush, pulsing tone that brings any instrument to life. So, why doesn’t everyone use one? Because they’re the size and weight of a bulky refrigerator, cost big bucks and are more high-maintenance than a platinum diva.

But, imagine getting all of that inspiring rich modulation with cutting-edge features in a studio-quiet, road-worthy pedal. Just one little pedal. Now imagine you can use that pedal with guitar and to record direct.

The Roto Choir recreates both the rotating lower speaker and the treble rotor horn – the only way to attain that complex, multi-dimensional tone. In fact, the Roto Choir utilities a specifically formulated SansAmp technology to deliver the entire signal chain – from the original tube power amp to the speaker and high-frequency rotor horn, to the microphone used to capture it. This is HD, 3D emulation.

The simple controls hide a wealth of options. Drive adds just the right amount of compression, harmonics and grit. Low and High sculpt the tube amp emulation with powerful EQ curves. The Fast/Slow footswitch allows users to ramp up, slow down or even stop the rotating speaker. There’s also a dedicated control to custom set the Top Speed of your rotor. Want to vary the intensity of the effect? Simply adjust the Position control to move the Roto Choir’s virtual mic closer or further from the horns.

Other features include a biamped/single-speaker mode switch, stereo output and a Speaker Sim switch for direct recording. Find the easy way to celestial sounds you can get lost in with the Roto Choir.

Tech 21 Guitar Pedals


NAMM 2011: Rivera Shaman Guitar Pedals

January 17, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

Rivera-Shaman-Back

NAMM 2011 — Rivera Shaman Making their surprise debut last Friday alongside the all-new Rockcrusher attenuator, Rivera have announced a new range of stompboxes – the first to be released under the Rivera name for thirty years.

The Shaman range kicks off with three very different overdrive pedals: the Blues Shaman is aimed at blues players; the Metal Shaman is for metallists – naturally; and for everything else the Double Shaman promises to be a highly versatile performer, with two channels called LA and Austin. Read more

NAMM 2011: Jack Deville Mod Zero Guitar Pedal

January 16, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

modzero-guitar-effects-pedalNAMM 2011 — The new Mod Zero is the latest guitar effects creation by Portland Oregon boutique designer Jack Deville Electronics. Mod Zero is the all-in-one box that creates all types of modulation and some special “holy grail” tones that players have chased for years. Mod Zero is a 100% analog modulation box that features vintage and modern takes on famous and unheard sounds. Read more

NAMM 2011: Toadworks launches DECO Effects Pedals

January 11, 2011 by · Leave a Comment 

toadworks-eqNAMM 2011 — ToadWorks USA announces the release of a new line of DSP-based effects under the DECO brand. Rugged new DSP-based effects, ‘hand-crafted in the USA’

All DECO pedals feature True-Bypass switching with a user-controlled defeatable buffer. In addition, all stereo effects will feature DECO’s exclusive True-Stereo output. Read more

Aguilar AGRO and Filter Twin Pedals for Bass Review

November 2, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Aguilar AGROThe answer to “Why design pedals specifically for bass?” is a little more nuanced than some might think. Guitar effects often include a “free” low-cut filter that starts rolling off around 90Hz, on the assumption that guitar strings don’t go that low but hum does, so why not reduce the hum?
While that’s fine for guitar, the effect becomes unsuitable for bass, as the instrument’s natural fundamental frequencies can’t make it through. Read more

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