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Easy Guitar Songs To Play

June 30, 2010 by · 1 Comment 



Easy Songs Play On GuitarOften times, when someone picks up the guitar for the first time, the first thing they want to do is learn their favorite songs. However, if your favorite song happens to be Van Halen’s “Eruption”, you’re going to need a bit more experience. Beginners are better off starting with easy guitar songs that also sound good, so they don’t become discouraged and hang up the instrument before they’ve even begun to learn. Read more

Beginner Guitar Chords Lesson – 3 String Chords C, G and D7

January 19, 2010 by · Leave a Comment 

Beginner Guitar Chords LessonWhen we start learning to play the guitar we do it for one reason, to learn chords. After all songs are made up of chords right? Of course if you’re a beginner yourself and have tried learning chords you can probably vouch for just how difficult it can be to make those shapes, keep your fingers on the strings without blunting those below them and so fourth. Read more

Randy Rhoads “Over the Mountain” Guitar Tone

November 7, 2008 by · 2 Comments 

Randy RhoadsIt’s been a long time since Randy Rhoads left us but there are many who still rave about his characteristic crunch. Randy had a slight different sound from album to album but it usually had a sort of thin and bright, nasally tone. He carried quite a few guitars but was usually seen with his Les Paul and of course his famous polka-dotted flying V.

To go for Randy’s sound on “Over the Mountain” from Ozzy Osbourne album Diary of a Madman, start with a standard distortion pedal. Crank the gain control wide open, the tone at about mid, and the level set at a comfortable level (comfortable being relative). Pay close attention to the amount of distortion the pedal produces; many just won’t have enough grind. If this is the case, switch to a metal type distortion but increase the tone or presence control to one or two o’clock. Next in the chain of effects is an octave pedal for use on the first of the solo. If you’re lucky enough to have a real pitch transposer, set it for one octave down using a chromatic scale type and play the high part. Keep in mind this will not sound exactly like it does on the song but it will sound a lot closer than if you went without. Last is the stereo chorus set to simulate the double guitar. Leave it on for the entire song. Read more

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